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The Human Element
 

The Need for Professional
Driving Careers is Increasing

Still the Knights
of the Road

Kings of the
Asphalt Jungle

As people retire, age-out, change careers, experience burn-out, or even become disqualified for whatever reason, we must have a robust pipeline of qualified and motivated professionals ready to take the wheel. The human element is huge, and no matter what technology and autonomy promises, we need people.

The truck driver shortage is on track to become acute. With everything pointed to on these pages, you can see how this is more than just a “trucking industry” concern; it is a challenge that affects our economy and quality of life collectively. Major sectors of our economy depend on professional drivers spending long hours and days on the road. They sacrifice being present for important moments and milestones in the lives of their families and themselves.

In recognition of all this it’s imperative that we support these supply chain soldiers and that we do all we can individually and in matters of public policy to protect, defend, sustain, and promote these individuals.

In South Carolina, a seasoned trucker can earn a competitive salary that ranges from $45,000 to $75,000. In many sectors the pay and benefits amount to much more.

This compensation for essential service not only provides for families and their communities, it ensures the continuity, sustainability, and stability of the entire supply chain. In a sense, truck drivers are cornerstones of our economy.

Beyond what we’ve shown, millions of “truckers” are actively involved in initiatives like Truckers Against Trafficking, where they serve as vigilant eyes on the road, helping to combat human trafficking. During the holiday season, they participate in Wreaths Across America, ensuring our fallen heroes are honored with respect and dignity. They join the Truck Convoy for Special Olympics, showing their immense compassion and support for individuals with intellectual disabilities. There are countless acts of duty and everyday-heroism truck drivers do anonymously and without any desire for recognition.

Let's celebrate the human side of trucking by looking up to them, showing a friendly face, and letting them see your appreciation for keeping our economy moving and our lives enriched.

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